What users are saying about

GitHub

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352 Ratings
47 Ratings
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Score 7.7 out of 101

GitHub

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352 Ratings
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Score 9.1 out of 101

Add comparison

Likelihood to Recommend

Apache Subversion

I'd recommend Subversion for almost any software development effort. It is less appropriate for any project with widely geographically distributed developers. For VERY elaborate projects, a higher end commercial tool might be warranted.
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GitHub

Github is great for large enterprise organizations due to the speediness of its searching through code.
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Pros

  • The default conflict resolution option, to merge locally, has led to a much more efficient work environment when working with large teams on large codebases. The traditional single-person file locking can really get in the way of team work, as you have to wait for your team member to finish their changes before you can start working on the same file, even if they called in sick for work that day. While sometimes this requires manually figuring out what to do when two changes affect the same line of code, most of the time the changes are on the same lines of the file, and merging can happen transparently.
  • I have enjoyed the branching process in subversion. Branches and tags are not strict features of the product, which allows for fudgibility, but when you use the recommended trunk/tags/branches folder layout, it behaves as if it was built it. Implemented simply as copy/branch and merge functions, I have found them to work just as well as a built it system would work, and it does a good job pointing out issues with a change's ancestry.
  • Subversion also have a rich ecosystem of third-party tools and service providers. I personally have used TortoiseSVN for years, but there are several plugins that integrate directly into Visual Studio or Eclipse. Also, I have found hosting services like CVSDude (now called CloudForge) to be a big time-saver over hosting a repository on your own servers, while providing peace of mind that your code-base is in a different physical location, in case say, your server farm burned down. (I'd call that a serious edge condition, but my job involves edge conditions!)
Scott Mitting profile photo
  • Cloud based repo - don't have to worry about the storage
  • Many tools that work with Github so committing work is easier
  • Easy to setup the security for the repos
Rajesh P R Mangipudi profile photo

Cons

  • Refactoring the layout of a respoitory--or a part of a repository--can be a bit painful, especially for users with workspaces associated with the affected part of the repository. Not sure what could be done to make that better, but it would be nice if something was possible.
  • Folks coming from Git can have problems using Subversion. Again, not sure anything can (or should) be done to address that, but it is occasionally an issue.
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  • The merges are at the branch level, so every folder within the branch has to be merged. This means lot of colloboration or more branches.
Rajesh P R Mangipudi profile photo

Likelihood to Renew

Apache Subversion3.1
Based on 2 answers
While there are interesting alternatives, such a GIT, Subversion has been a breath of fresh air compared to its predecessors like CVS or Microsoft Source Safe (now called Team Foundation Server). Its ease of use and high adoption rate is going to keep me using this product for years to come.
Scott Mitting profile photo
No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Usability

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
GitHub9.0
Based on 1 answer
- Easy to use compared to other version control software. UI interface makes it easy to use, as well as protects against making a major mistake by deleting code, etc.- UI looks modern.- Support for multiple platforms, which I assume will only get better with time.- Student benefits are awesome!- The size limitations on their repositories make sense to me. Not too crazy but realistic from a business perspective.
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Alternatives Considered

I find Perforce to be a little more cumbersome to use than Subversion. And it is NOT free or open source.
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Gitlab has many more features (and many more for free). However, it is less mature and a little less stable than GitHub.Bitbucket is very good for enterprises, as that its main focus. It also ties in well with the other Atlassian products (Jira, Bamboo, etc.). However, Bitbucket is less intuitive and not as suited for collaboration. Basic things like searching for and inside of repositories is cumbersome.Stash is Bitbucket's red-headed stepchild. Avoid it, it's there as a legacy product.
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Return on Investment

  • Subversion helps us feel secure in maintaining access to all of our product code, both current and historical.
  • Being free and open source makes it an even better "investment".
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  • Eliminates the need for manually tracking file changes, etc, leading to more time spent evaluating our actual software, and less time managing the process
  • Fair pricing per-seat for most organizations, but can get expensive
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Pricing Details

Apache Subversion

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

GitHub

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details