Threat Hunting Tools

Threat Hunting Tools Overview

Threat hunting, also sometimes referred to as cyberthreat hunting, is the process of analyzing a network to identify and preemptively neutralize unknown threats within the network. Threat hunting tools allow security professionals to quickly handle threats in an organization’s digital landscape before those threats have a chance to do harm to the organization. These tools can include advanced analytical input and output, security monitoring, integrated security information and event management (SIEM), security orchestration, automation, and response (SOAR) systems, and managed detection and response (MDR) systems.

When a bad actor breaches a network, they can remain undetected for weeks or even months. Malware, or malicious software, can cause vast amounts of damage by siphoning off sensitive information from the organization or the organization’s clients. This is where the concept of threat hunting comes in. Using data gathered by security analytics and threat intelligence software, security professionals can proactively scan, identify, log, nullify, and monitor the network for new potential threats. Threat hunting tools can be complementary to an organization's established security measures, and serve as an additional layer of security for the organization's network.

Threat hunting tools are closely related to threat intelligence, but the two aim to accomplish different goals. Threat intelligence is the process of using analytics to collect information on a specific threat which can be useful for identifying similar threats in the future. Threat hunting is the process of using data analytics to scan a network and act on any instances of threats that are discovered. In many cases, threat intelligence plays an active role in threat hunting.

There are three different types of threat hunting: structured hunting, unstructured hunting, and situational or entity driven hunting. Structured hunting is driven by traits of an attacker such as indicators of attack and techniques and procedures. Unstructured hunting is guided by triggers, or events that alert hunters to threat patterns found within the network. Finally, situational or entity driven hunting is defined by a situational hypothesis or an entity-aligned lead which guides where the threat hunter should look in the network.

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Threat Hunting Products

(1-11 of 11) Sorted by Most Reviews

The list of products below is based purely on reviews (sorted from most to least). There is no paid placement and analyst opinions do not influence their rankings. Here is our Promise to Buyers to ensure information on our site is reliable, useful, and worthy of your trust.

Splunk Enterprise Security (ES)

Splunk Enterprise Security (SIEM) is the company's flagship SIEM product, offered as a premium service to subscribers of Splunk Cloud or Splunk Enterprise.

Key Features

  • Custom dashboards and workspaces (108)
    87%
    8.7
  • Event and log normalization/management (106)
    87%
    8.7
  • Deployment flexibility (106)
    85%
    8.5
Splunk SOAR
Customer Verified
Top Rated

Splunk now offers a security orchestration, automation, and response (SOAR) platform via its acquisition of Phantom. Splunk Security Orchestration and Automation (Splunk SOAR) provides playbook automation and is available as a standalone solution.

CrowdStrike Falcon Endpoint Protection

CrowdStrike offers the Falcon Endpoint Protection suite, an antivirus and endpoint protection system emphasizing threat detection, machine learning malware detection, and signature free updating. Additionally the available Falcon Spotlight module delivers vulnerability assessment…

Key Features

  • Malware Detection (33)
    95%
    9.5
  • Centralized Management (33)
    93%
    9.3
  • Infection Remediation (33)
    92%
    9.2
Splunk IT Service Intelligence (ITSI)

Splunk supports IT operations analytics with the Splunk IT Service Intelligence premium offering, a software application available to subscribers to Splunk Cloud or Splunk Enterprise log analytics and SIEM platforms.

Capgemini Insider Threat Intelligence Platform

Insider Threat Intelligence (ITI) OverviewITI is a software application that provides organizations of any size the ability to mature their Insider Threat Program. It empowers insider risk analysts with automation and analytics to improve their ability to proactively identify high…

Phishing Catcher

Phishing Catcher is an open source threat hunting tool that allows a user to proactively search for potential phishing domains based on issued TLS certifications.

DNSTWIST

DNSTWIST is an open source threat hunting tool that allows a user to proactively scan for potentially hazardous domains.

YARA

YARA is an open source threat hunting tool that identifies and classifies malware software.

Clearnetwork Managed Detection and Response

Clearnetwork is a platform that monitors, detects, and acts on threats within a network. It also utilizes log management and security information and event management to track malware events within a network.

Telefónica Tech Next Defense- MDR

Starting from 7.99 USD/month per endpoint. Managed Detection and Response (MDR) services protect endpoints by identifying and responding to threats while providing full incident support. Their mission is to provide the latest protection, technology and experts to help during those…

Kaspersky Anti Targeted Attack Platform

The Kaspersky Anti Targeted Attack Platform uses machine learning approaches to detect targeted attacks across network telemetry through a combination of automated network traffic analysis, correlative behavioral analysis, and other approaches to detect multi-layer threats across…

Learn More About Threat Hunting Tools

What are Threat Hunting tools?

Threat hunting, also sometimes referred to as cyberthreat hunting, is the process of analyzing a network to identify and preemptively neutralize unknown threats within the network. Threat hunting tools allow security professionals to quickly handle threats in an organization’s digital landscape before those threats have a chance to do harm to the organization. These tools can include advanced analytical input and output, security monitoring, integrated security information and event management (SIEM), security orchestration, automation, and response (SOAR) systems, and managed detection and response (MDR) systems.

When a bad actor breaches a network, they can remain undetected for weeks or even months. Malware, or malicious software, can cause vast amounts of damage by siphoning off sensitive information from the organization or the organization’s clients. This is where the concept of threat hunting comes in. Using data gathered by security analytics and threat intelligence software, security professionals can proactively scan, identify, log, nullify, and monitor the network for new potential threats. Threat hunting tools can be complementary to an organization's established security measures, and serve as an additional layer of security for the organization's network.

Threat hunting tools are closely related to threat intelligence, but the two aim to accomplish different goals. Threat intelligence is the process of using analytics to collect information on a specific threat which can be useful for identifying similar threats in the future. Threat hunting is the process of using data analytics to scan a network and act on any instances of threats that are discovered. In many cases, threat intelligence plays an active role in threat hunting.

There are three different types of threat hunting: structured hunting, unstructured hunting, and situational or entity driven hunting. Structured hunting is driven by traits of an attacker such as indicators of attack and techniques and procedures. Unstructured hunting is guided by triggers, or events that alert hunters to threat patterns found within the network. Finally, situational or entity driven hunting is defined by a situational hypothesis or an entity-aligned lead which guides where the threat hunter should look in the network.

Threat Hunting Platforms Features & Capabilities

Threat hunting requires a wide range of features and functions. These typically include:

  • Machine learning
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Statistical analytics
  • Intelligence analytics
  • Behavioral analytics
  • Security monitoring and analytics
  • Integrated SIEM systems
  • Integrated SOAR systems
  • Integrated MDR systems
  • Threat intelligence
  • Spreadsheets

Threat Hunting Platform Comparison

The platform’s integrations, security and reporting, and threat intelligence are crucial to the successful identification and termination of threats within a network. Some organizations may also find tools that allow for additional reporting and logging of threat patterns, which could provide insight for preventing them in the future. To better compare threat hunting tools, consider the following:

Analytics: A good tool should be able to use analytics and insights to identify threats, and then provide information about the threat afterwards. Threat hunting tools use analytics to establish patterns of behavior based on each threat’s tactics and techniques. This allows an organization to adjust their security landscape and better prepare for threats using similar patterns. Look for a tool that values the information that can be gathered from hunting a threat and then shares the information in as much detail as possible.

Features: When comparing threat hunting tools, keep in mind that some tools offer different features. These could range from specific functionality that a tool specializes in, such as MDR, to a suite of features that include a variety of different services. Features can add to the overall scope of your organization, or it could be that you may have such systems in place already. In either case, it would be important to consider how additional features could play a role in your existing network systems.

Open Source vs. Paid Products: Pricing is another important aspect of threat hunting tools to consider. It should be noted that many of the products in the free range are open source, which means they will require a certain degree of technical knowledge to implement effectively. The trade off is that a user can fully customize open software to their needs. Open source threat hunting tools will cost less upfront but require more set up initially, while closed source threat hunting tools may cost more but come with dedicated teams to handle most of the setup work.

Pricing

There is a range of pricing options available for threat hunting tools ranging from free to enterprise level packages which can cost upwards of hundreds of thousands of dollars.

For users who feel more comfortable with downloading and installing program files, open source solutions may be a better choice. These solutions offer users the ability to customize and personalize the threat hunting tools specifically to their needs. However, if scalability is a concern, you may want to consider closed-source solutions.

Closed-source solutions, or paid solutions, are typically billed on a monthly basis per endpoint that is protected. For users looking for threat hunting tools and services that are already packaged together and scalable with business needs, a paid option might be the way to go. Most of these solutions offer services to scan, monitor, and handle threats within a network, and sometimes include a dedicated team of analysts to manage your network activity.

Related Categories

Frequently Asked Questions

What do Threat Hunting tools do?

Threat hunting tools work to proactively scan a network to find undiscovered threats, and handle them. These tools also can be used to log information about the threats and identify potential areas of improvement for network security.

What are the benefits of using threat hunting tools?

The main benefits derived from using threat hunting tools is time saved, money saved, and increased network security. These tools neutralize threats that can cost an organization millions of dollars per each data breach if not neutralized in a timely manner. They also provide an organization with more information about their security and the threats they currently face.

What make threat hunting tools distinct from other security software?

While closely related to threat intelligence platforms, threat hunting tools take cybersecurity one step further. Threat intelligence is the process of gathering information about threats within a network, while threat hunting is the process of hunting for threats within a network before they have a chance to do harm.

How much do threat hunting tools cost?

Threat hunting tools can be found in the form of free, open source files and can range all the way up to enterprise packages that might cost thousands of dollars depending on a user’s needs. Usually, vendors charge per endpoint used on a monthly basis. Some vendors will provide a free demonstration of their software, but it’s rare to find free trials of their products.